Danny Kemp.

There was a man lovingly tending his garden one day when a passerby stopped and admired his craft. The stranger stopped and glanced, then finding a need to comment, lingered and lent against the wall propping himself up by stretching out a hand onto the rotting gate post.

He was uncomfortable in the heat so wiped his brow by taking out a handkerchief from his jacket pocket and then when suitable composed said:
“Isn’t God wonderful. He gives us this Sun and the rains and turns everything in THE DESOLATE GARDEN from a wilderness to what you have achieved here before my weary eyes.” he paused for a second, casting his vision over all what spread out before him then continued with a slight shake of his head in approval. “A truly marvelous sight you must be so proud of all your work.”
The weary, but patient gardener, rose to his feet and braced his back rubbing it gently to ease away the strain of his labours then turned to face his new devotee and replied in a concerned Scottish tone:
“Aye you’re right enough there, but he sends the rain at the wrong time and the sun when I want to do all my work. If only he was to ask me when I wanted them, then it would be more appreciated.”
The wanderer thought about this for a few seconds, nodding his head in agreement until at last he made up his mind what to say:
“Yes, you are absolutely right there Old Chap but how does the saying go…. ‘you don’t always get what you want, you get what you need’….look at it that way my good fellow. Sometimes we should simply be grateful without complaint.” Silently he recalled how the Scots were never a race to expound on the joys of life.

The gardener, none too keen on the English in general and never used to looking at life in a charitable way before, saw no reason to change that philosophy. Suitably refreshed from his toils and struggles in the husbandry of God fine soil, quickly retorted:
“Aye you’re right enough there but God needs me, otherwise, left on his own he would make a fine mess of my garden and no mistake. Look at some of the others that you pass on your way!”
There is a moral here, one that few find: It is that we all have to work with God. Alone we muck it up. This world survives despite us, not because of us.

Pardon the little self advertising, please.

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About Danny Kemp

I was at work one sunny November day in 2006, stopped at a red traffic light when a van, driven incompetently, smashed into me. I was taken to St Thomas' Hospital and kept in for a while, but it was not only the physical injuries that I suffered from; it was also mental ones. I had lost confidence in myself let alone those around me. The experts said that I had post-traumatic stress disorder, which I thought only the military or emergency personnel suffered from. On good days, I attempted to go to work, sometimes I even made it through Blackwell Tunnel only to hear, or see, something that made me jump out of my skin and that's when the anxiety attacks would start. I told my wife that I was okay and going regularly, but I wasn't. I could not cope with life and thought about ending it. Somehow or other with the help of my wife and medical professionals, I managed to survive and ever so slowly rebuild my self-esteem. It took almost four years to fully recover, but it was during those dark depressive days that I began to write. My very first story, Look Both Ways, Then Look Behind, found a literary agent but not a publisher. He told me that I had a talent, raw, but nevertheless, it was there. His advice was to write another story and that I'm delighted to say, I did. The success of that debut novel, The Desolate Garden, was down to sheer hard work, luck, and of course, meeting a film producer.
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2 Responses to Danny Kemp.

  1. I loved this blog!! great words of wisdom.–hmm I thought I was already following — oh well am now!!

  2. Hi hon

    I’ve nominated you to receive The Versatile Blogger Award

    http://the-view-outside.com/2012/03/13/versatile-blogger-award/

    Xx

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