When Is It Right To Blame?

Pain, where is your sting, that thunderous hurt when pain begins and conscious thought dies?

Is it that first stab as flesh bleeds from a slashed wrist or when the second cut bites deeper?

The oozing bloodied sore etched on a child’s cheek or the recognition of desolation as safety is no more?

The strike of that flaying poker across a face, or the knowledge that the hand that struck will strike again, again, again.

Did the pain hit before the blow? Was it as simultaneous as thirst is quenched by drink?

Has the taste for pain quenched any tyrant’s thirst? Has your time in pain yet to burst? For some it never does!

Hearts die because of pain. Either emotionally or physically or both.

Death pain can linger in time, but since time began we will all die. Do pain and time correlate?

Pain at birth for the mother and child. Does the pain leave the mother on discovery that her child is demonised, as quickly as it does when giving life to a monster?

Memory is pain trying to hide. Does the pain only hurt when it’s too late?

Suffer in silence. Inject the morphine, float on that passing cloud.

Scream in anguish hope to die whilst shouting the pain out loud.

Deafen that torturer until he turns and runs to find another to inflict, or not?

Be altruistic! To be unselfish whilst enduring that which cannot be endured, How can pain be cured?

Pain can be transient, but it can be eternal. A sin charged living hell agonising in flame.

Lashings of life cut deep leaving scars that can be both seen and invisible to the eye.

Pain, where hides your alibi?

When is it right to blame?

© 2015, Danny Kemp. All rights reserved.

 

 

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About Daniel Kemp

Daniel Kemp, ex-London police officer, mini-cab business owner, pub tenant and licensed London taxi driver never planned to be a writer, but after his first novel —The Desolate Garden — was under a paid option to become a $30 million film for five years until distribution became an insurmountable problem for the production company what else could he do? Nowadays he is a prolific storyteller, and although it’s true to say that he mainly concentrates on what he knows most about; murders laced by the intrigue involving spies, his diverse experience of life shows in the short stories he compiles both for adults and children. He is the recipient of rave reviews from a prestigious Manhattan publication, been described as —the new Graham Green — by a managerial employee of Waterstones Books, for whom he did a countrywide tour of signing events, and he has appeared on ‘live' television.
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